How do I behave in Court to help my case the most?

You are always welcome to represent yourself which is known as going "pro se"; however, I've had more people than I care to count tell me that they felt invisible because the other party came to court with an attorney. You can avoid this problem by hiring an attorney.

If you decide to retain John H. Schmidt, Kentucky's premier divorce and family law lawyer based in Shepherdsville, then you've taken the 1st step but you can hurt your own case if you don't behave properly in court.

Courts appreciate litigants who keep themselves under control. Always let your attorney speak for you unless you are asked a question by an attorney or the judge. If you think your feelings might get the better of you, then turn to your attorney and whisper that you'd like to take a break. Don't roll your eyes. Don't sigh. Don't make disrespectful remarks. Don't try to outsmart the lawyers (not that you aren't smart or smarter but it looks bad). Always speak with a clear voice projected so the judge can hear you. Always say "Yes, your honor" or "No, your honor" when addressing the Court.

In terms of attire, please see our blog on proper attire for court.

Finding a Good Lawyer

One good way to find a lawyer is to check out their online recommendations, ask friends, acquaintances, or other lawyers and attorneys for referrals and then interview the candidates. Of course, Law Offices of John Schmidt & Associates is available for legal advice on child support today. Call us now!

If you are in Kentucky, then I’d recommend that you call my office at 502-587-1950 or 502-509-1490 to schedule a consultation to discuss your options.

Please set an appointment at Appointment with John Schmidt


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