A common question is do I need a lawyer?

People call my office and sometimes ask, "Do I need a lawyer?" You certainly are not required to have a lawyer, but I think it is a smarter choice than going without. If I were not an attorney and I read what you just read, I might be inclined to think, "What else would a lawyer say?" Right?

If you choose to represent yourself, then you are considered a pro se litigant. Kentucky courts still require pro se litigants to follow certain rules. Knowledge of the rules is extremely helpful in most cases. In criminal cases, the Commonwealth brings considerable resources to the table and an attorney might make all the difference for the accused. Watch the video below as an illustration of the point.

If the matter goes before the judge, then certain rules apply as to what can and cannot be entered into evidence. Without an attorney, you may find yourself walking out of the hearing or trial wondering what just happened or feeling like you didn't get the opportunity you expected to present your case. Although the video below is an exaggeration, it is a humorous illustration of the point.

Finding a Good Lawyer

One good way to find a lawyer is to check out their online recommendations, ask friends, acquaintances, or other lawyers and attorneys for referrals and then interview the candidates. Of course, Law Offices of John Schmidt & Associates is available for legal advice on child support today. Call us now!

If you are in Kentucky, then I’d recommend that you call my office at 502-587-1950 or 502-509-1490 to schedule a consultation to discuss your options.

Please set an appointment at Appointment with John Schmidt


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